Friday 25th July 2014,
Imagine Science Films

2013 Panels & Conversations

ISFF VI OPENING NIGHT PANEL: STORYBOARDING DATA

In collaboration with Google NY and Nature Publishing Group.
Friday, October 11, 2013 7pm POST-SCREENING

—PANEL—

The 6th Annual Imagine Science Film Festival kicks off the festival with a panel that explores how data can be used to blur the lines between science and art. What are the scientific and cinematic processes used to translate scientific data into the visual narratives? As data is recycled and used as an artistic paintbrush, does it lose its credibility or accuracy? At what point does data become fictional?

Aaron Koblin // Digital Artist

Aaron Koblin is an American digital media artist best known for his innovative uses of data visualization and crowdsourcing. He is currently Creative Director of the Data Arts Team at Google in San Francisco, California.
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Tiffany Shlain// Filmmaker, Founder of the Webby Awards

Tiffany Shlain is a filmmaker, artist, public speaker and founder of The Webby Awards. Tiffany’s work with film, technology, and activism has received 50 awards and distinctions and her last four films have premiered at Sundance. She just released a new film and accompanying TED Book called Brain Power. Her acclaimed feature documentary, Connected: An Autoblogography about Love, Death & Technology, is currently screening around the world and is available on all digital platforms at www.connectedthefilm.com. It was selected by The US State Department as part of the American Filmmaker Showcase to represent America.

A celebrated thinker and speaker, she is on the advisory board of The Institute for the Future, has advised Secretary Clinton on technology & society, and presented the campus-wide Commencement address at UCBerkeley.
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Ali Brivanlou// Developmental Biologist, Head of Laboratory of Stem Cell Biology and Molecular Embryology at The Rockefeller University

Ali Brivanlou is a developmental biologist and heads the Laboratory of Molecular Embryology at Rockefeller University in New York. Much of his research focuses on the molecular events and cellular interactions that regulate the emergence of key structures in the early embryo. In the course of this research, he has made several influential discoveries, including the unanticipated finding that all embryonic cells will develop into nerve cells unless they receive signals directing them toward another fate.
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Moderated by:

Alex Pasternack// Editor-at-large of Motherboard and a co-founder of bandwagon.io

Alex Pasternack is a journalist and the founding editor of Motherboard, Vice’s technology and culture portal, where he now serves as editor-at-large. His short films for Motherboard have previously screened at Imagine Science. He is also a co-founder of Bandwagon.io, a New York-based technology company dedicated to taxi and ride sharing.
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—VENUE—
Google NY | Downtown Manhattan
79 9th Avenue
New York City, NY 10011
Subway: A,C, E, L to 8th Avenue

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A CONVERSATION WITH EVE SUSSMAN

Saturday, October 12, 2012 8pm POST-SCREENING $15 GENERAL ADMISSION | $9 STUDENTS
MUSEUM OF MOVING IMAGE: Tickets: $15 public / $9 Museum members / Free for Silver Screen members and above. Order online or call 718 777 6800 to reserve tickets.

Eve Sussman

Q & A with Director of whiteonwhite:algorithmicnoir, Eve Sussman.

Eve Sussman is a British-born American artist. She resides in Brooklyn, New York, where her company, the Rufus Corporation is based; however, she continuously visits cultural centers around the world, where her exhibitions take place.

Sussman’s work incorporates film, video, installation, sculpture, and photography. In 2003 she began working in collaboration with The Rufus Corporation – an international ad hoc ensemble of performers, artists, and musicians –[1] and has produced the extraordinary motion picture and video art pieces 89 Seconds at Alcázar (2004) and The Rape of the Sabine Women (2007).Sussman translates well known masterworks into her large scale re-enactments.

Sussman will talk about her overall work as well as whiteonwhite:algorithmicnoir , a computer-edited film that follows the observations and surveillance of a geophysicist code writer stuck in a futuristic city.

—VENUE—
Museum of the Moving Image | Queens 3601 35th Avenue
Long Island City, NY 11106
M, R Steinway St

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DNA ETHICS

In collaboration with Eugene Lang College, The New School
Sunday, October 13 4pm POST-SCREENING

How will pinpointing genes for behaviors and traits alter our sense of identity and the way we relate to one another? Who is using genetic technologies and for what reason? Can genomics and cloning influence prediction, choice, and consequence?

—PANEL—

Joseph Osmundson// Postdoctoral Fellow, Systems Biology, NYU

Joseph Osmundson is a scientist based in New York City. He is currently a postdoctoral fellow at New York University where he studies the molecular dynamics of proteins involve in DNA replication. He did his graduate work at The Rockefeller University examining protein structure/function relationships in pathogenic bacteria. He has taught at The New School and Vassar College and has written about science, policy, race, and sexuality for various online and print outlets.

Angelica Ferguson// PhD Candidate, Tri-Institutional Program in Chemical Biology, Weill Medical College of Cornell University

Angelica Ferguson graduated from Eugene Lang College in 2006 with a double major in “Interdisciplinary Science” and “Cultural Studies & Media.” Her senior thesis work at Lang focused on bioterrorism and included a docudrama exploring such themes as microbial pathogenesis, outbreak preparedness, prevention and surveillance, and the use, manipulation and influence of the media. After graduating, Angelica went on to work at The Rockefeller University in the laboratory of Prof. Michael Rout where she helped developed novel biochemical strategies to analyze macromolecular complexes involved in ribosome biogenesis and nuclear transport. Eventually, Angelica went on to join the Tri-Institutional PhD Program in Chemical Biology (Rockefeller, Weill Cornell, MSKCC) where she currently works in the laboratory of Prof. Scott Blanchard conducting biophysical investigations into the dynamics of the mammalian protein translation machinery using single molecule-FRET microscopy. In her thesis work, Angelica seeks to understand the mechanism of human translation at a kinetic level as well as how ribosome functionality and heterogeneity contribute to various disease states.

Alexa Riggs// Eugene Lang Alumni in Interdisciplinary Science

Alexa Riggs is a Eugene Lang alumni in Interdisciplinary Science, Psychology and Gender studies, research coordinator at Beth Israel Medical Center interested in the intersections between LGBTQHI community activism and health inequity research.

—Moderated by—

Katayoun Chamany// Associate Professor at Eugene Lang, Natural Sciences and Mathematics

Katayoun Chamany was born in Iran, raised in Iowa, and trained as a geneticist and cell biologist. Katayoun finds the study of biological processes fascinating. For over a decade she has been conducting research to better understand why some students share her love for biology, while others recoil from the subject. Part of her work suggests that biology courses must be contextualized and made relevant, especially for those students who don’t initially see biology as important to their everyday experiences. To promote this education reform, she has developed seminars, workshops and educational materials that reflect an interactive and case-based method of teaching and learning. She firmly believes that biology is accessible and relevant to everyone, and that a basic understanding of biology it important for contributive members of society.

—VENUE—
Theresa Lang Student Center, The New School
55 West 13th Street, Room I202 (between 5th and 6th)
New York, NY, 10011
Subway: N, Q, R, 4, 5, 6 to 14th Street-Union Square; L to Sixth Avenue; F, M to 14th

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EVENT: FILM LAB

IMAGINE SCIENCE SATELLITE: QUITO CINE CIENTIFICO

In collaboration with Imagine Science Satellite, MNNA, and part of the Film Lab evening.
Sunday, October 13 7pm

“Amanecer” Kevin, 11 años, from Ecuador visto por los niños

A presentation of the winning animation film from Imagine Science Satellite: Quito Cine Cientifico from last March; “Contracorriente” (prize sponsored by Metropolitan Touring, Ecuador), and a series of photos from the project “Ecuador visto por los niños” (to visit blog click here: http://ecuadorvistoporlosninos.tumblr.com/).

From April 26th through May 2nd of this year, Imagine brought Science Films to Quito, Ecuador. In collaboration with Alliance Française Quito and Museo del Niño y del Niño en el Adulto and support from a large number of institutions and partners, including UNESCO, the program included a wide selection of films, Latin American and from elsewhere in the world, portraying science, scientists through a filmmaker’s sensibility to interpret and expose this knowledge, ultimately making science accessible and stimulating to a broader audience. For more information, visit the Satellite page here.

INVISIBLE OCEAN AND LA BOHEME

In collaboration with Made in NY Media Center and part of The Film Lab evening.
Sunday, October 13 7pm 

Film Lab will also include an exclusive advance screening of filmmaker Emily Driscoll‘s new short documentary Invisible Ocean: Plankton and Plastic. The director will be in attendance to present the film and take part in a Q&A.

During a Tara Oceans expedition to study the health of the oceans, NYC sci-artist Mara Haseltine finds an unsettling presence in samples of plankton she collected. The discovery inspires her to create a sculpture revealing an ongoing invisible battle beneath the water’s surface, showing that the microscopic Ocean world affects all life on Earth. 
The evening will close with a short preview film of  environmental artist Mara Haseltine‘s sculptural performance piece “La Bohème: A Portrait of Today’s Oceans”, which had its world premier at the agnès b. gallerie last March.
Depicting the poor young poet Rodolfo, who falls in love with Mimi, a young grisette who is dying of consumption. In this case, Mimi is the plankton sculpture ensnared in plastic — a representation of our ailing oceans. The performance intends to highlight the close relationship between humans and the health of the microscopic world, in particular our oceans.

Following Film Lab, Mara G. Haseltine invites guests to her open studio for a live performance of “La Bohème” at her DUMBO studio at 10:15.

Mara G. Haseltine is an internationally renowned artist known for her sculptural renditions of microscopic life forms. She was an early pioneer in the translation of bioinformatics into threedimensional forms. She is an ardent environmentalist and co-founder of The Green Salon, aninternational think tank devoted to environmental solutions. For further information, visit her website at http://www.calamara.com

Emily V. Driscoll is a documentary producer and the founder of BonSci Films, a production company specializing in science and art documentaries. Her award-winning documentaries have aired on PBS stations and screened at museums, film festivals, theaters and universities in the US, Europe and Asia. She has a master’s degree in science journalism from New York University and is a visiting professor of science video production at New York University.

—VENUE—
Made in NY Media Center | DUMBO
30 John Street
Brooklyn, NY 10011
Subway: F York St, A, C High Street

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AS ABOVE, SO BELOW

In collaboration with The Rockefeller University
Wednesday, October 16 7pm POST-SCREENING

Umicore electronic scrap recycling in Hoboken, Belgium. Photo credit: David Kimelman

Sarah J. Christman makes non-fiction films that explore the intersections between people, technology and the natural world. She received the New Visions Award from the San Francisco International Film Festival for her film “Dear Bill Gates”, and Jury Awards from the Ann Arbor Film Festival for “Broad Channel” and “As Above, So Below.” Christman’s work has screened widely, including MoMA Documentary Fortnight, Rotterdam International Film Festival, Toronto International Film Festival, New York Film Festival, and Los Angeles Filmforum. She is an Assistant Professor in the Film Department at Brooklyn College.

The complex interactions between human and environmental processes are examined in Christman’s latest feature, “As Above, So Below.” This experimental documentary explores contemporary methods of transmutation. Shedding light on local and global acts of alchemy, the film is an intimate reflection on human and material lifespan. Christman documents her mother’s experience of having her late husband’s ashes turned into a memorial diamond, a story that frames a larger investigation into the recycling of matter. The film’s subjects range from Belgium, where precious metals are extracted from discarded electronics, to Staten Island’s Fresh Kills, once the world’s largest landfill, now being transformed into a massive public park.

Moderated by

Alexis Gambis // Artistic Director & Founder of Imagine Science Films

Alexis is a French-Venezuelen scientist, filmmaker and founder of Imaginal Disc, a film production company focused on scientific storytelling. His work is interdisciplinary and diverse, yet focuses on bridging the sciences and the visual arts through film, exhibits and installations, research and teaching. He received his Ph.D in Molecular Biology from The Rockefeller University, a Masters in Bioinformatics from the University of Marne la Vallée and Bachelor of Arts from Bard College.

—VENUE—

Rockefeller University | CRC/Carson Lecture Hall | Upper East Side
1230 York Avenue
Manhattan New York, NY 10065
Subway: 4, 5, 6 67th Street/Lexington / F train to 63rd / Lexington

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VISUALIZING SCIENTIFIC DATA ON THE BIG SCREEN

In collaboration with NYAS’ Science and the City and NYU Office of Global Affairs.
Thursday, October 17, 2013 7pm

—PANEL —

With NYAS’ Science and the City program and , the 6th Annual Imagine Science Film Festival presents a panel that tackles how data is digested, processed and translated to the big screen.

Film is primarily a visual media and communicates on sensory, emotional and intellectual levels. Science can also be a sensory and intellectual medium, especially when scientists present their data visually. Join the New York Academy and the Imagine Science Film Festival for a discussion that explores how data – from huge data sets generated by genomics to maps of the brain – can be captured through the visual storytelling of film.

Science writer Carl Zimmer and a panel of scientists and artists will explore how scientists use film to communicate their ideas and how artists can use the techniques of data visualization to enhance your scientific and visual experience.

Oliver Medvedik // The Cooper Union, TED Fellow

Oliver Medvedik is presently the Sandholm Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology and Bioengineering at The Cooper Union and also a cofounder of Genspace, New York City’s community biotechnology laboratory. As part of his doctoral work at Harvard Medical School, he used single-celled budding yeast as a model system to map genetic pathways that regulate longevity. For the past fours years he has mentored undergraduate teams for the international genetically engineered machines competition (IGEM).

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Amy Robinson // Crowdsourcer, Creative Director of EyeWire

Amy Robinson is a crowdsourcer. She is the Creative Director of EyeWire, a game to map the brain from Sebastian Seung‘s Computational Neuroscience lab at MIT. EyeWire is a community of 60,000 gamers from 130 countries who together are helping us decipher the mysteries of information processing in the brain.
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Jonathan Fisher // Director of The Neurodome Project, Neuroscientist at The Rockefeller University

Jonathan Fisher is the director of Neurodome, a research associate at The Rockefeller University, and a pianist. His scientific work focuses on neuroimaging and sensory neuroscience. As a performing artist, he has created events that explore the interface between art and technology. Jonathan received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Pennsylvania in 2007 and is the recipient of several awards and grants, including the 2013 Blavatnik Award for Young Scientists. Prior to his work in neuroscience, he was a researcher in astrophysics and built components for BLAST, a balloon-borne telescope that studied the cosmic infrared background.
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Moderated by:

Carl Zimmer// Popular Science Writer and Blogger

Carl Zimmer is a science writer, especially regarding the study of evolution and parasites. The New York Times Book Review calls Carl Zimmer “as fine a science essayist as we have.” In his books, essays, articles, and blog posts, Zimmer reports from the frontiers of biology, where scientists are expanding our understanding of life. He has written several books and contributes science essays to publications such as The New York Times and Discover. He is a popular speaker at universities, medical schools, museums, and festivals, and he is also a guest on radio programs such as Radio Lab and This American Life.

—VENUE—
New York Academy of Sciences| Manhattan
250 Greenwich St # 40, New York, NY 10007
1, 2, 3 to Chambers St.

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EUROPA REPORT

Tuesday, October 15, 2013 7pm

How do we make sure visual effects accurately portray what we know about outer space? Where do we draw the line between documentary and fiction? Is it important to categorize a film as one or the other?

—PANEL—

Kevin Hand // Astrobiologist and Expert on Europa at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Matt Levin // Associate Producer of Europa Report

—VENUE—
NeueHouse | Manhattan
110 East 25th Street
New York City, NY 10010
Subway: 6 to 23rd street

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ISFF VI CLOSING NIGHT PANEL

Friday, October 18, 2013 7pm


A discussion with filmmakers about the interplay between experimentation and the natural world.

—PANEL—

Sarah J. Christman// Documentary Filmmaker, Director of Gowanus Canal

Sarah J. Christman makes non-fiction films that explore the intersections between people, technology and the natural world. She received the New Visions Award from the San Francisco International Film Festival for her film “Dear Bill Gates”, and Jury Awards from the Ann Arbor Film Festival for “Broad Channel” and “As Above, So Below.” Christman’s work has screened widely, including MoMA Documentary Fortnight, Rotterdam International Film Festival, Toronto International Film Festival, New York Film Festival, and Los Angeles Filmforum. She is an Assistant Professor in the Film Department at Brooklyn College.

 

Josh Koury// Documentary Filmmaker, Director of We Will Live Again

Josh Koury is a documentary filmmaker living and working in Brooklyn, NY. His first film, STANDING BY YOURSELF, received critical acclaim after opening theatrically in 2002. His second feature length documentary, WE ARE WIZARDS, had its World Premiere at SXSW in March of 2008 and was later theatrically released in 5 cities across the country. Additionally, Koury co-founded the Brooklyn Underground Film Festival where he served as Programming Director for five years. He also spent four years working at the Hamptons Int’l Film Festival as a Programmer and their Programming Manager. He is currently a faculty member at the Pratt Institute.

 

Jenifer Wightman // Scientist and Artist, Creator of transforming microbial colorfield in Gowanus Canal

Jenifer Wightman is a biologist specializing in greenhouse gas inventories and life cycle analysis of agronomic systems at Cornell. Her art practice began in 2002 and employs scientific tropes to incite curiosity of phenomena. Using pigmented bacteria as a model system for visualizing growth and decay patterns in a finite landscape, she is interested in forming an ecological rationality by reflecting on the co-evolution of a culture and its supporting ecosystem. She has been awarded residencies at MacDowell, Nordic Artists’ Centre, and Lower Manhattan Cultural Council.

 

Rachel Miller // Coordinator of Feature Programming at Tribeca Film Institute

Rachel Miller is Coordinator of Feature Programming at Tribeca Film Institute, a non-profit arts organization that provides grants and professional guidance to filmmakers. TFI’s Sloan Filmmaker Fund and the Sloan Student Grand Jury Prize were created to support compelling narrative features that offer a fresh take on scientific, mathematic and technological themes – these, among many other grants, are awarded yearly through Tribeca Film Institute. Pre-Tribeca, Rachel worked in web, film, and music video production; she managed an art gallery and has written for The Huffington Post and The Guardian, among others. She is a graduate of Smith College.

Moderated by:

Ellen Jorgensen, Ph.D.// Co-founder and President of Genspace, speaker at TEDGlobal

Ellen Jorgensen, Ph.D. is passionate about increasing science literacy in both student and adult populations, particularly in the areas of molecular and synthetic biology. She teaches courses and workshops in molecular and synthetic biology for the general public at Genspace, and is involved in numerous collaborations with educational outreach organizations aimed at developing and implementing better science education at the middle school, high school, and undergraduate level. During this summer she will be the leading mentor of the Columbia University-Cooper Union 2011 iGEM team. Dr. Jorgensen received her Ph.D. in Cell and Molecular Biology from the Sackler Institute at New York University School of Medicine in 1987, and went on to continue her research in protein structure/function at SUNY Downstate in Brooklyn. Since then she has held numerous positions in the biotechnology industry and biomedical research-based nonprofits. From 2001 to 2009 she was Director of Biomarker Discovery and Development at Vector Research, where she led a group searching for early biomarkers of tobacco-related lung disease. She is presently an adjunct faculty member at New York Medical College. Her latest project is to DNA barcode the plants of the Alaskan tundra.

Tickets available at the door:
General admission $8, students FREE with ticket and ID